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Soundproofing

Soundproofing

10 replies [Last post]
Thu, 31/01/2013 - 20:08
Looking at soundproofing a wall of my terrace house. Anyone done it or has any tips and pointers?

Cheers
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Count Cookula's picture
#1
Thu, 31/01/2013 - 20:36
You might want to explain the circumstances and what you're hoping to achieve. 100% soundproofing is tricky and very expensive and nigh on impossible to do to just one surface of a room but you can do quite a bit of stuff to help reduce transmission which can, to a limited degree, reduce the noise penetrating from one side of a wall to the other. It depends what your expectations are and what your budget is.
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#2
Thu, 31/01/2013 - 22:39
There's some good information here:

http://www.silcom.com/~aludwig/My_Music_Room.htm

I looked at it when I had my house re plastered, but decided it just wasn't practical in the end.
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#3
Thu, 31/01/2013 - 23:08
Thanks guys.

I've had an outside space between myself and the neighbour enclosed with a door/wall and a polycarbonate roof. Got decks in there with some hi fi and i just want to minimise the noise through to my neighbour. Maybe spend £500 max to soundproof a wall say 7ft high by 12ft length.
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#4
Fri, 01/02/2013 - 04:43
What the Count said.

Maybe this this PDF will help.
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Count Cookula's picture
#5
Fri, 01/02/2013 - 09:39
So, you may be able to do some remedial work to the party wall to reduce transmission through that surface but I suspect bass transmission via the floor and the side walls is going to remain a problem for you. Hopefully you can get it to a manageable and acceptable level though. Keep your speakers away from the party wall and maybe try mounting them on foam or use some other technique to uncouple them from the hard surfaces of your room. Low end vibration is going to be your main issue.

True soundproofing can only be achieved by building a "floating" 2nd room within your existing room, which is extremely costly.
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#6
Fri, 01/02/2013 - 09:52
Cheers for the feedback. Interesting comments
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man_traic's picture
#7
Sun, 03/02/2013 - 23:27
Count Cookula wrote:
undproofing can only be achieved by building a "floating" 2nd room within your existing room, which is extremely costly.


Ive done this, (Partially, a decoupled wall, but an attatched ceiling, so not true 'RWAR') and it is indeed expensive.

If I read the OP correctly, they are trying to soundproof a conservatory? This will be difficult.
I have a large cellar in my property that has an airgap, insulated double plastrtboard wall then another airgap and another insulated stud wall. floors and ceiling are insulated but not decoupled.

I can run a large pair of celestion ditton floorstanding speakers and a 200 watt amp full blast - you hear nothing next door.

But you won't do it with a conservatory - and certainly not for 500 quid.
Ask me if you want more details
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Cosmic Jane's picture
#8
Wed, 13/03/2013 - 17:05
It it's an adjoining wall then building a stud wall filled with dense fiber matting (the denser the better!) and a double layer of plasterboard will damp sound. Leave a small air space between the new wall and existing wall.
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#9
Tue, 15/10/2013 - 07:10
Interesting post thanks for sharing !
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murt's picture
#10
Tue, 15/10/2013 - 08:20
surely sound will transmit most readily through the polycarb roof and any windows on your neighbour's side wall?
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